Jimmy Hayes, a Boston College hockey legend, died this morning at the age of 31. Hayes was found dead at his Milton home on Monday, according to the Boston Globe, and his death is not being investigated. The reason for death was unknown at the time.

Hayes, who grew up in Dorchester, attended Noble and Greenough Schools in Dedham before going on to play three seasons at Boston College from 2008 to 2011, In 2010, he assisted the Eagles in winning the national title. Hayes spent seven seasons in the NHL between 2011 and 2018, including two with the Bruins after being acquired from the Panthers in exchange for Reilly Smith. In 2014-15, he had his greatest season with Florida, scoring 19 goals and 16 assists in 72 games.

Kevin Hayes, Hayes’ younger brother, is also an NHL player who is currently with the Philadelphia Flyers.

From 2008 to 2011, Hayes was a member of the Boston College hockey team before moving on to the Chicago Blackhawks, Florida Panthers, New Jersey Devils, and his hometown Boston Bruins, as well as a few AHL teams. Hayes was joined to BC by his brother Kevin, as well as cousins Ryan and Casey Fitzgerald.

Hayes was a member of the Boston College squad that won the national championship in 2010.

With the Eagles, he also won two Beanpots and two Hockey East Championships.

Jimmy Hayes was a key player in a number of BC games, including scoring the game-winning goal in overtime against Northeastern in the 2011 Beanpot and scoring two goals in 23 seconds (while celebrating with John Wall) in BC’s 9-7 win over Yale in the 2010 NCAA Regionals.

 He finished his BC career with 41 goals and 81 points.

Jimmy Hayes was also passionate about giving back. Hayes changed his number to 11 in remembrance of his friend, former Boston College and Babson hockey player Corey Griffin, who died in 2014. He also participated in a number of charity hockey games, including the Comm Ave Classic, which benefitted the Travis Roy Foundation and Compassionate Care ALS.

Hayes was always entertaining to watch as a player because it was obvious how much he enjoyed himself. Hayes’ attitude, more than his hockey performance, is what made him so popular in his hometown of Dorchester, at Boston College, and across the hockey community.

Anyone who knows anything about him would tell you that he was a lovely guy who was always ready with a joke and a smile.“Of all the kids I’ve taught, he’s in the top five in terms of being good to coach and hangs out within the locker room,” Jerry York told the Globe’s Matt Porter this morning. I was awestruck by his off-ice contributions to our squad on numerous occasions.”

Kevin Hayes, Hayes’ younger brother, is also an NHL player who is currently with the Philadelphia Flyers.

Hayes was a member of the Boston College hockey team from 2008 to 2011, before moving on to the Chicago Blackhawks, Florida Panthers, New Jersey Devils, and his native Boston Bruins, as well as a few AHL teams. Hayes’ brother Kevin, as well as cousins Ryan and Casey Fitzgerald, accompanied him to BC.

Hayes was a member of Boston College’s 2010 National Championship team. With the Eagles, he also won two Beanpots and two Hockey East Championships.

Hayes was a key player in a number of BC games, including scoring the game-winning goal in overtime against Northeastern in the 2011 Beanpot and scoring two goals in 23 seconds (while celebrating with John Wall) in BC’s 9-7 win over Yale in the 2010 NCAA Regionals.

 He finished his BC career with 41 goals and 81 points.

Hayes was also passionate about giving back. Hayes changed his number to 11 in remembrance of his friend, former Boston College and Babson hockey player Corey Griffin, who died in 2014. He also participated in a number of charity hockey games, including the Comm Ave Classic, which benefitted the Travis Roy Foundation and Compassionate Care ALS.

Hayes was always entertaining to watch as a player because it was obvious how much he enjoyed himself. Hayes’ attitude, more than his hockey performance, is what made him so popular in his hometown of Dorchester, at Boston College, and across the hockey community.

Anyone who knows anything about him would tell you that he was a lovely guy who was always ready with a joke and a smile. “Of all the kids I’ve coached, certainly in my top 5 as far as being nice to coach, to hang in the locker room with,” Jerry York told the Globe’s Matt Porter this morning. I was awestruck by his off-ice contributions to our squad on numerous occasions.”

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