‘Jeopardy’ Host Mayim Bialik Targeted in Phony CBD Endorsement

We investigated misleading and deceptive web advertising claiming “allegations” against actor and “Jeopardy” host Mayim Bialik had been “verified,” as well as a bogus Fox News piece claiming she had endorsed Premium Jane CBD candies that may help “cure dementia” in early March 2022. The report was crafted to look like it came from Fox News, but it was not written by them. The advertisement and storey looked to be made in China.

 

The Cloaking Technique

We were sent to a page on denuvo.fun that looked like the Fox News website but had nothing to do with Fox News after clicking the fake ad concerning specific claims against Bialik. The website’s designer used this lookalike method to trick viewers into thinking it was authentic. Denuvo.fun, according to data, was registered on a Chinese web domain registrar less than a month ago, on February 18.

Only viewers who clicked the ad on denuvo.fun saw the bogus Fox News storey. Any effort to copy and paste the identical link to the storey without the ad’s referral code at the end resulted in a bogus online store named Bodega being shown on the website. If the URL was “denuvo.fun/?fbclid=123example,” and the code “?fbclid=123example” was deleted from the link, the phoney online store would appear instead of the bogus Bialik endorsement. This was an attempt by the website’s creator to hide the bogus Bialik endorsement from anyone who was looking into it.

The Fake CBD Endorsement

Bialik’s image and likeness were utilised in the post regarding Premium Jane CBD candies, but there was no mention of any claims being “verified.” The use of the word “allegations” was nothing more than sensationalism.

The story’s byline included the name of Fox News presenter Brit Hume. According to the post, Bialik was interviewed by Martha MacCallum of Fox News, and the two had a “heated” conversation. According to the fake tale, MacCallum wanted Bialik “indicted” because she insisted on pushing Premium Jane CBD on the show. “Premium Jane CBD has radically altered my life, and it’s evident that MacCallum is trying a coup,” the report said, quoting fellow Fox News personality Tucker Carlson.

Her picture and resemblance may have also been surfacing elsewhere, according to Google Trends. Kushly CBD, Green Otter CBD Gummies, Clinical CBD Gummies, and Smilz CBD Gummies were mentioned in a search for Bialik’s name.

Other Celebrities Featured in Fake CBD Endorsements

We’ve seen this tactic before, with bogus CBD endorsements from Tom Selleck (twice), Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg on talk shows, and late “Jeopardy” host Alex Trebek. The cloaking approach was also used in several cases, making it impossible to return to the phoney endorsement page at a later time.

According to The New York Times, actor Clint Eastwood previously sued a Lithuanian firm and won a $6.1 million lawsuit after they “were accused of utilising Mr. Eastwood’s name and likeness to make it look as though he was supporting their wares.”

On March 9, we emailed the Premium Jane CBD gummies firm, using the support email address stated on their website. We inquired about its privacy policy, which stated a Scottsdale, Arizona mailing address, as well as if the corporation was aware of the denuvo.fun website. We also wanted to know if the substance was sold under different names, such as Premium Jane CBD. If this strategy was adopted, the product would continue to sell even if one of the names received terrible reviews or bad news. Within five days, Premium Jane CBD had not responded.

In conclusion, there were no “verified” claims against Bialik, and the “Jeopardy” host did not recommend Premium Jane CBD, Kushly CBD, Green Otter CBD Gummies, Clinical CBD Gummies, or Smilz CBD Gummies.

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